The Watch House Crail, Scottish Architecture, Fife Residential Project, Drawings

The Watch House in Crail, Fife

Waterfront Residential Architecture Development in Scotland – design by Alan Dunlop architect

29 Jan 2020

The Watch House, Crail

Architect: Alan Dunlop

Location: Crail, Fife, Eastern Scotland

Planning Approval and Listed Building and Conservation Area Consent granted unconditionally for The Watch House Crail

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop

The project is for the renovation of The Watch House, in Crail. The building is listed and sits within the conservation area in Crail, overlooking the Firth of Forth and The Isle of May. It is a spectacular site.

The Watch House View

There is limited written history other than the watch house was built in 1782 and a dormer head panel dating from the 16th century sits above what was the main entrance, which appears to be from an arched doorway off of the pathway to the Kings Mill. The watch house keeper controlled the lade, the supply of grain, goods and water coming into the Kings Mill. The Kings Mill dated back to the 12th century but was demolished in 1920.

The Watch House View

Photos © Anna Dunlop

The watch house appears to have been abandoned, then used as a store and eventually converted badly into holiday accommodation in the 1970s until it was bought early this year by my New York-based client, who is a frequent visitor to Scotland’s East Coast.

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop

Her intention is to live in the house during here extended stays in Fife and to renovate the original sandstone building, remove the kitchen addition to the south east elevation and dilapidated, cantilevered wc and shower room to the rear. Making the building habitable, meet current building regulations, better respect the status of the conservation area and become a permanent home.

The Watch House View

A hardwood rainscreen system will veil the grey pebble dash surround to the stairwell, also added to the original structure and provide a continuity of material, detail and finish to the north east and north west elevations. Similarly, the balustrade to the deck above the new dining room area will also be constructed from the same hardwood uprights.

The Watch House View

The materials chosen are contextual and suited to the site and as complementary additions to the original structure. Care has been taken in design and detailing. There is a consistency of proposed materials and detailing throughout. In accordance with “HES Key Issues” for extensions to listed buildings, the restoration and new additions respect the building’s listed status and great care has been taken acknowledge the character of the original structure.

The Watch House View

The structure, rainscreen, windows, screens, deck, balustrade, cills, window and screen reveals are hardwood, for a consistency of material and confidence that the proposed materials will age well and continue to complement the original building over time. Hardwood, particularly oak, is an appropriate construction and finishes material and often used by the National Trust for Scotland when adding new structure to historic buildings.

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop – The Watch House Full Elevation with Castle Wall

Inspiration has also been gained from a review and visit to the piers and historic structures along the Fife coastline and other additions to listed buildings. Consequently, oak is contextually appropriate for the construction of the new dining room and rainscreen veil.

The Watch House View

Planning and Listed Building Consent Report:

A great deal of pre-application research and meetings have been carried out with this proposal and care has been taken to ensure that any addition to the original structure would protect and enhance the historical integrity of the building, whilst being subordinate in scale and form using appropriate finishing materials.

The Watch House View

The proposed extension would not result in a detrimental visual impact to the original building and creates a balanced and innovative design to the property, which is sympathetic to the property without any adverse visual impact to the surrounding environment.

13 & 11 Oct 2019

The Watch House, Crail in Fife

Architect: Alan Dunlop

Location: Crail, Fife, Eastern Scotland

Renovation of The Watch House, in Crail, Fife.

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop – The Watch House Development Drawings

It is a spectacular site. The Watch House was built 250 years ago and the watch house keeper controlled the supply of grain, goods and water coming into the Kings Mill. The Kings Mill dated back to the 12 century but was demolished in 1920.

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop – The Watch House North West and North East Elevation

The last watch house keeper retired in 1909. The building was abandoned and eventually converted badly into holiday accommodation until it was bought early this year my New York based client. My client is a frequent visitor to Scotland’s East Coast.

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop – The Watch House South West and South East Elevation

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop – The Watch House Plans

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop – The Watch House Cross Section and Detail

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop – The Watch House Long Section and Detail

The Watch House Crail
drawing © Alan Dunlop

Images: Alan Dunlop and Anna Dunlop

The Watch House in Crail, Scotland images / information received 111019

Location: Crail, Kingdom of Fife, Scotland

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