Scottish National Online Database – Buildings Scotland, Canmore

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National Online Database Scotland : Canmore

RCAHMS – National Collection, Scotland, Europe

11 Aug 2009

Scottish National Online Database

NATIONAL COLLECTION SEEKS PUBLIC INPUT TO ITS ONLINE HERITAGE DATABASE

A national online database that holds information on and images of more than 280,000 of Scotland’s buildings and built archaeology opens its files today (Tuesday, August 11) so that members of the public can add their own knowledge directly to its archives.

RCAHMS1 is the national collection of images and items about Scotland’s built heritage. The Edinburgh-based organisation maintains a searchable website allowing interested people quick access to archive materials about the built heritage throughout Scotland, ranging from ancient archaeological sites to the latest architectural ventures.

Forth Bridge
Forth Bridge

From today, its main web-based archive – Canmore – will become interactive for the first time. Members of the public can add detail to any of Canmore’s 280,000 places of interest and upload copies of their own site photos to share with other users. The innovative project has received Heritage Lottery funding to develop the system.

RCAHMS project manager, Siobhan McConnachie said:
“The RCAHMS online database gives access to a lot of information about Scotland’s built heritage and it is completely accessible to the public. The collection ranges from drawings and photographs of prehistoric sites such as Skara Brae, to iconic modern structures such as the Falkirk Wheel as well as a huge range of material on our everyday buildings from villages to cities across the whole of Scotland.

“We know from the work that we do and the people we meet while doing it, that many people have a wealth of information they would like to share with us that will add to our knowledge of a building’s past or images that will help tell a story.

“We decided that our determination to be as accessible as possible meant making it as easy as it could be for people to contribute their information, stories or reminiscences in a way that could be retained, shared and added to.

“Since we have already developed a responsive digital web archive, it seemed a logical and exciting step to open it up to the public in this way,” she said.

Princes Street, Edinburgh
Princes Street

Your contributions can be added on http://canmore.rcahms.gov.uk/. Entering information is as easy as adding to an online conversation.

“The interactive elements will be self-monitoring. We expect that the majority of entries will come from people who are enthusiastic about Scotland and its culture, and how its story is told through our built heritage,” Siobhan McConnachie said.

For over one hundred years, RCAHMS (the Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Scotland) has been collecting, recording and interpreting information on the architectural, industrial, archaeological and maritime heritage of the nation, creating a unique archive that offers a remarkable insight into the special nature of Scotland’s Places. Over 15 million items, including photographs, maps, drawings and documents are made widely available to the public via the web, through exhibitions and publications, and at the RCAHMS search room in Edinburgh.

http://www.rcahms.gov.uk/share-your-knowledge-with-the-national-collectionl


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