Philip Johnson Glass House, New Canaan

Philip Johnson Glass House Connecticut, 20th Century American Building, Modern Home America

Philip Johnson Glass House : Modern Connecticut Architecture

20th Century American Property: New Photos – home design by Philip Johnson Architect

Sep 21, 2017

Philip Johnson Glass House News

September Programs at the Glass House + Lynn Davis: On Ice

Friday, October 27, 2017
5:00pm – 8:00pm
Tickets: $350

The Glass House is proud to announce an opportunity to hear from two of the world’s most preeminent architects, Norman Foster and Robert A.M. Stern. Beginning with their youthful relationship studying architecture at Yale in the early 1960s, these men have known each other since the very beginnings of their illustrious careers.

Each has exerted a global influence on buildings as well as the urban environment overall. For this fundraising event, they will discuss both their shared history as well as their vision for how architecture can contribute to a more sustainable environment and how the role of the architect is evolving in response to global issues today.

Preservation, this intimate conversation and dinner benefits preservation at the site.

Ticket includes cocktail reception, conversation with Norman Foster and Robert A.M. Stern, and dinner featuring Krug Champagne.

Aug 14, 2017
September Programs at the Glass House + Lynn Davis: On Ice

Noyes House:
Noyes House New Canaan mid-century residence
photo : Michael Biondo

September Programs at the Glass House

Study Tour: Glass House + Noyes House

Monday, September 11, 1:00 – 5:30pm

Tickets for Study Tour: Glass House + Noyes House

Visit two important examples of New Canaan mid-century residential architecture on a half-day study tour of Philip Johnson’s Glass House (1949) and the Eliot Noyes House (1954). Tickets for this program include tours of both sites, shuttle transportation between sites, and light refreshments.

Glass House Presents: Frederick Noyes on the Noyes House

Tuesday, September 12, 6:00 – 8:00pm

New Canaan Library

Register for Frederick Noyes on the Noyes House

Join architect Fred Noyes at New Canaan Library for a free lecture about his childhood home, the Noyes House (1954) in New Canaan. Designed by Eliot Noyes and included on the National Register of Historic Places, the house’s unique composition – two enclosures for public and private functions connected by an open air courtyard – remains highly provocative. Fred will analyze the intent and design of the house in comparison to the Glass House (1949), designed by Philip Johnson.

Study Tour: Philip Johnson in Manhattan

Saturday, September 23, 2:00 – 5:30pm

Tickets for Philip Johnson in Manhattan

Hilary Lewis, Chief Curator and Creative Director of the Glass House, will lead a study tour of several important examples of architecture designed by Philip Johnson in midtown Manhattan, including the Museum of Modern Art’s Sculpture Garden, the exterior of the Rockefeller Guest House, and more.

Glass House Presents: The Modern Interior

Thursday, September 28, 5:30 – 8:00pm

Tickets for The Modern Interior

Join curators David A. Hanks, Juliet Kinchin, and Hilary Lewis for a discussion about the furniture inside the Glass House, much of which derives from Philip Johnson’s 1930 New York apartment designed by architect Mies van der Rohe and Lilly Reich.

Lynn Davis: On Ice

August 24 – November 30, 2017

Lynn Davis: On Ice presents a selection of photographs from the artist’s longstanding engagement with the icebergs on the sea outside of Ilulissat, a small town on the edge of a glacier off the west coast of Greenland. Developed over the course of six expeditions that began in 1986, Davis’s photographs evidence strong affinities with the spare geometry of minimalist sculpture and track the dramatic transformation of the natural environment. As the Glass House commemorates its 10th year as a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the exhibition additionally celebrates Davis’s friendship with David Whitney and Philip Johnson, both of whom collected the artist’s work.

Lynn Davis: On Ice

Previously on e-architect:

Jul 8, 2017
New Exclusives at the Glass House Design Store

We are celebrating the 111th anniversary of Philip Johnson’s birth this Saturday, July 8th with the release of the new Modernist Paperweight designed by Werkstätte Carl Auböck Vienna exclusively for the Glass House Design Store.

Inspired by Philip Johnson’s iconic glasses, these life-sized “spectacles” were lovingly created for us by Carl Auböck lV and are available in patina or polished brass. Each piece bears the official Auböck stamp and comes with exclusive certification from the Werkstätte Carl Auböck. Truly an amazing “must have” for any mid-century aficionado, architectural enthusiast, design lover, or collector. Limited quantities available.

May 21, 2017

Hermès and the Glass House present Centered Rhyme

Hermès and the Glass House are honored to introduce Centered Rhyme, a limited-edition 90x90cm silk twill scarf featuring a design by the late American artist Elaine Lustig Cohen (1927-2016). The design is based on a large-scale 1967 painting by the artist.

To purchase, please contact the Glass House Design Store via phone at 203-594-9884 x0 or email at A portion of the proceeds from the sale the Centered Rhyme scarf will go towards the preservation of the Glass House.

Centered Rhyme by artist Elaine Lustig Cohen |

Elaine Lustig Cohen was highly regarded as a graphic designer, artist, and rare book dealer throughout her career, which spanned over fifty years. In 1955, she began her design work in New York by extending the idiom of European modernism into an American context for her diverse clientele of publishers, corporations, cultural institutions, and architects. Her first client was Philip Johnson – architect of the celebrated Glass House (1949) in New Canaan, Connecticut – who commissioned her to design the lettering and signage for the iconic Seagram Building.

The two forged an important bond that resulted in a variety of projects for the Glass House, Yale University, and Lincoln Center, among others. As a painter, Lustig Cohen developed a hard-edged style in the 1960s and 1970s that asserted the canvas’ flat surface. She continued to experiment with bold colors, linear patterning, and abstract shapes in a variety of media including collage and three-dimensional objects.

Following a 2015 exhibition of the artist’s early paintings and graphic design at the Glass House, Pierre-Alexis Dumas, artistic director of Hermès, met the artist at her Manhattan home and conceived of a scarf based on her painting Centered Rhyme (1967). Pierre-Alexis and Elaine discovered a deep intellectual and philosophical connection while touring her remarkable personal collection of eclectic art and artifacts, including ancient printed silks.

The project was made in collaboration with the Glass House, a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, that in alignment with Hermès values is dedicated to the promotion of cultural and architectural preservation, artistry and craftsmanship.

The limited-edition Hermès 90cm x 90cm silk twill design, $395.00, will be presented in Lustig Cohen’s original coloration; crème/jaune/rose, and sold at the Glass House Design Store and Hermès boutiques.

Apr 18, 2017

Recent Glass House News

10th Anniversary Glass House Summer Party

10th Anniversary Glass House Summer Party, June 10, 2017 – Tickets on sale now!

Glass House Summer Party

Sep 21, 2016

Philip Johnson Glass House Chief Curator News

The Glass House appoints Philip Johnson scholar Hilary Lewis as Chief Curator & Creative Director

The Glass House, a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, is pleased to announce the appointment of Hilary Lewis as the site’s Chief Curator & Creative Director starting January 17, 2017. Lewis has spent more than two decades focused on the work of Philip Johnson. As an architectural historian, curator and journalist she has researched, presented and written many materials on Johnson since her first collaboration with the architect in 1992. She spent over a decade working directly with Johnson on texts, exhibitions and a multiyear project of recording his memoirs.

Philip Johnson, Hilary Lewis and John O’Connor at Library by Nora Feller:
Philip Johnson scholar Hilary Lewis

“Having sat side-by-side with Johnson for years, I feel confident that what would honor his and David Whitney’s memory most would be for the property to evolve further as a center for the appreciation of architecture, design and art not just as a museum of Johnson and Whitney’s lives in New Canaan,” noted Lewis. “It’s an honor to have the opportunity to work directly with the Glass House as it looks forward to its second decade of public engagement.”

“Hilary Lewis has influenced the Glass House site since its inception as a public museum. She will be a great addition to a great team. I look forward to her continuing contributions in programming content, visitation alternatives, site interpretation and team management.”, said Gregory Sages, Executive Director at the Glass House.

Lewis received her training in architectural history and urban planning at MIT and Harvard, where she also taught. Since that time, she has co-authored Philip Johnson: The Architect in His Own Words and The Architecture of Philip Johnson, the former receiving the 1995 AIA International Architecture Book Award. As an author, she has contributed to a variety of books on architecture and planning and has been a founding editor of four magazines on architecture and design, which deepened her knowledge and experience relating to Midcentury Modern architecture. Overall, her work addresses the public aspects of architecture, preservation and design.

As a curator, Lewis developed the show and catalog Philip Johnson: Architecture + Art for the Johnson-designed Kreeger Museum. In 2007, she was named the Philip Johnson Scholar at the site. Until recently, Lewis served on the Glass House’s Advisory Council.

The Glass House was built between 1949 and 1995 by architect Philip Johnson, the Glass House is a National Trust Historic Site located in New Canaan, CT. The pastoral 49-acre landscape comprises fourteen structures, including the Glass House (1949), and features a permanent collection of 20th century painting and sculpture, along with temporary exhibitions. The tour season runs from May through November and advance reservations are required. For more information, and to purchase tickets, visit

The National Trust for Historic Preservation, a privately funded nonprofit organization, works to save America’s historic places to enrich our future.

21 Sep 2016

Philip Johnson Glass House Photos

New Photos of Philip Johnson’s Glass House

Photographs: Simon Garcia |

Johnson House, New Canaan, Connecticut, USA
Date built: 1949
Design: Architect Philip Johnson

Johnson House New Canaan

The Glass House was completed in 1949. It is a National Trust Historic Site on a 49-acre campus.

Johnson House New Canaan

Inspired by architect Mies van der Rohe’s Farnsworth House (Plano, IL, 1951), its exterior walls are made of glass, a radical departure from houses of the time.

Johnson House New Canaan

Johnson House New Canaan

The Glass House was the start of Philip Johnson’s fifty-year odyssey of architectural experimentation in forms, materials, and ideas, through the addition of other structures. These include the Brick House/Guest House, Pond Pavilion, Painting Gallery, Sculpture Gallery, Ghost House, Library/Study, Da Monsta, and the methodical sculpting of the surrounding landscape.

Johnson House New Canaan

Johnson House New Canaan

The campus serves as a catalyst for the preservation and interpretation of modern architecture, landscape and art.

Johnson House New Canaan

Johnson House New Canaan

Johnson House New Canaan

Photos: Simon Garcia |

Johnson House New Canaan

11 Apr 2014

Philip Johnson Glass House Programs

Spring 2014 Programs at the Glass House

Glass House Presents

Glass House Presents is an ongoing series of public programs – including conversations, performances, and gatherings – that sustains the site’s historic role as a meeting place for artists, architects, and other creative minds. Before each event, visitors will enjoy the opportunity to explore the Glass House campus and view current exhibitions, including Fujiko Nakaya: Veil. The program concludes with light refreshments. Public programs take place from 3:00 to 5:30 p.m. on Sundays, and 5:30 to 8 p.m. on Thursdays.

May 18, 2014 – Maya Lin + Edwina von Gal
June 8, 2014 – David Adjaye + Thelma Golden

Philip Johnson Glass House
photo : Sandra Hamburg


Glass House Presents is generously supported by an anonymous donor.
Night Sounds #4
Featuring lucky dragons
A musical performance + reception
at the Glass House
May 4, 2014, 3:00 – 5:30 p.m.

lucky dragons is an ongoing collaboration between Los Angeles-based artists Sarah Rara and Luke Fischbeck. Active since 2000, lucky dragons is known for an open and participatory approach to making music, radically inclusive live shows, and playful, humanistic use of digital tools. Photo by Tom Hall.


Night Sounds #4 is generously supported by a grant from the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.
Into the Fog with Fujiko Nakaya
Panel discussion at the Japan Society, New York
May 13, 2014, 6:30 p.m.

Renowned artist Fujiko Nakaya, known for her pioneering use of fog as a sculptural medium, is joined by Henry Urbach, Director of the Glass House, to discuss the artist’s current project, Fujiko Nakaya: Veil, on view at the Glass House through November 30.


Fujiko Nakaya: Veil is generously supported by the National Endowment for the Arts, the Robert Rauschenberg Foundation, The Japan Foundation, and Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope®. Additional support is provided by Mee Industries, Inc.
Self-Guided Tours

Self-guided tours of the Glass House offer visitors a unique opportunity to experience the Glass House campus at their own pace. In addition to the permanent art collection and temporary exhibitions, visitors enjoy access to seven structures designed by Philip Johnson, including: the Glass House, the Painting Gallery, the Sculpture Gallery, Da Monsta, and the Library, as well as the lower landscape’s Pond Pavilion and Lincoln Kirstein Tower. Photo by Carol Highsmith.


Glass House Summer Party, June 14, 2014

The Glass House Summer Party will take place on Saturday, June 14 from 12 noon to 4 p.m. With support from Swarovski, the Summer Party will feature a festive picnic lunch, lawn games, music, and a silent auction along with opportunities to experience Fujiko Nakaya: Veil and the entire Glass House campus.

11 Apr 2013

Philip Johnson Glass House Exhibition

New Exhibitions at The Glass House

E.V. Day, SNAP!
May 2 – Nov 30, 2013

Tauba Auerbach, Gnomon/Wave for Night (1947 – 2015)
May 2 – Sep 1, 2013

The Glass House Exhibition : full set of information

The Glass House, a site of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, is pleased to announce the opening of E.V. Day’s SNAP!, an exhibition for the building known as Da Monsta, as well as the debut of a new sculpture by Tauba Auerbach, Gnomon/Wave, for the ongoing exhibition Night (1947 2015), a project that brings a single contemporary sculpture inside the Glass House itself.

SNAP! is a site-specific exhibition by New York-based artist E.V. Day. Conceived for the building known as Da Monsta (1995), the last building completed by Philip Johnson on the Glass House campus, SNAP! comprises four recent sculptures as well as site-specific installations for the building’s interior and exterior. E.V. Day is the first artist the Glass House has invited to reinterpret the building, originally intended as a visitor center and now used as a project space for contemporary art.

Upon arrival at the Glass House, visitors will immediately encounter Day’s reinterpretation of Da Monsta. Responding to Philip Johnson’s statement that “the building is alive,” Day boldly casts a series of massive red nets across its undulating volume, capturing and staking Da Monsta to the ground. The interaction between artwork and building continues inside.

27 Aug 2012

Philip Johnson Glass House Building

The Glass House Announces Fresh Flowers Program

New program reintroduces fresh flowers to the Glass House; floral displays to be inspired by and reflect design sensibility of Philip Johnson and David Whitney
Will coincide with the Glass House tour season, May to November 2012
Generously supported by Architectural Digest magazine

May-Nov 2012
The Glass House
199 Elm Street, New Canaan, CT 06840
Open Thursday-Monday, 9:30a.m-5:30 p.m.
Tickets start at $30.

New Canaan, Conn (August, 2012) – For the first time since Philip Johnson lived in his iconic Glass House, fresh flowers will be on display there, bringing new life to the building’s interiors. The Glass House has launched a program, announced by Director Henry Urbach, to reintroduce fresh flower arrangements, which have not been seen in the house since Philip Johnson’s and his partner, David Whitney’s, passing in 2005. Local designer Dana Worlock will reinterpret Whitney’s original plant selection, adding and adapting to suit the specific environmental conditions and seasonal changes of the Glass House.

Philip Johnson and David Whitney with fresh flowers at The Glass House, 2003, New Canaan, Connecticut, USA:
Philip Johnson Glass House
photograph : Todd Eberle

The flowers, mostly gathered from the site and chosen based on archival photographs, will be integrated back into the Glass House as a symbol of new life to come: this program is the first of several initiatives being launched to rededicate the site as a lively, creative cultural center in keeping with the spirit and values of its former occupants-Johnson, the renowned architect, and Whitney, who was an editor and independent curator.

Flowers at The Glass House, 2003:
Philip Johnson Glass House
photograph courtesy The National Trust for Historic Preservation

“It’s about providing our visitors with an even richer experience and celebrating renewal as the Glass House transforms from a house museum to a living intellectual and cultural center. Even this modest element reflects a way to explore new opportunities for creative engagement. During Philip’s and David’s lifetime, the Glass House nearly always had fresh flowers, and we wanted to honor this legacy. We’ve consulted historical photographs; as much as possible, we remain close to their sensibility and use flowers gathered from the site,” Urbach said.

Henry Urbach, Director of The Glass House, and Dana Worlock, designer, with fresh flowers at The Glass House, 2012.
Philip Johnson Glass House
photo courtesy of The Glass House

An avid gardener since childhood, David Whitney cultivated a wide range of seasonal plants throughout the site’s 49 acres of lawns, meadows, woods, wetlands, and gardens. Whitney and Johnson enjoyed cuttings throughout the year when they were in residence in New Canaan.

This exciting new program is generously supported by Architectural Digest magazine.

Flowers at The Glass House, 2003:
Philip Johnson Glass House
photograph courtesy The National Trust for Historic Preservation

The Glass House

The Glass House, a National Trust Historic Site, offers its 49-acre campus as a catalyst for the preservation and interpretation of modern architecture, landscape, and art, and as a canvas for inspiration and experimentation honoring the legacy of Philip Johnson (1906-2005) and David Whitney (1939-2005).

Fresh flowers at The Glass House, 2012.
Philip Johnson Glass House
photo courtesy of The Glass House

Architectural Digest

Architectural Digest is the international authority on design and architecture and provides exclusive access to the world’s most beautiful homes and the fascinating people who live in them, bringing its audience a wealth of information on architecture and interior design, art and antiques, travel destinations and extraordinary products; its AD100 list of top architects and designers is one of the industry’s most relied-upon indexes of talent. Every day, Architectural Digest inspires millions of affluent readers through a multi-platform presence that includes print and digital editions and a newly relaunched website,

The National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation is a nonprofit membership organization bringing people together to protect, enhance, and enjoy the places that matter to them. By saving the places where great moments from history-and important moments of everyday life-took place, the National Trust for Historic Preservation helps revitalize neighborhoods and communities, spark economic development, and promote environmental sustainability. With headquarters in Washington, DC, nine regional and field offices, 29 historic sites, and partner organizations in all 50 states, the National Trust for Historic Preservation provides leadership, education, advocacy, and resources to a national network of people, organizations and local communities committed to saving places, connecting us to our history, and collectively shaping the future of America’s stories.

To learn more about the Philip Johnson Glass House visit

Philip Johnson Glass House information from National Trust for Historic Preservation / Philip Johnson Glass House, 270812

Johnson House, New Canaan
Date built: 1949
Architect: Philip Johnson

Philip Johnson Glass House architect : Philip Johnson

To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.

Connecticut Architecture

Another famous Modern American House on e-architect:

Farnsworth House, Plano, Illinois, USA
Architect: Mies van der Rohe
Farnsworth House
picture © gm+ad architects

Farnsworth House

American Houses
Holley House
photo : Michael Moran

Modern House
Frank Lloyd Wright House in Buffalo
photo : Biff Henrich / courtesy MHRC

Recent Connecticut Building

Morse and Ezra Stiles Colleges, Yale, New Haven
1962 (Eero Saarinen)
Renovation + new-build in 2011: KieranTimberlake
Morse and Ezra Stiles Colleges Building
image from FD

Morse and Ezra Stiles Colleges
This project won the Gold Medal from the AIA Philadelphia Chapter and was shortlisted in the New/Old Category at the 2011 World Architecture Festival.

Connecticut Houses

Major 20th Century Connecticut Houses, alphabetical:

Brant House, Greenwich
Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates

Breuer House II, New Canaan
Marcel Breuer Architect

Stillman House III, Litchfield
Marcel Breuer Architect with Tician Papachristou

Gagarin House II, Litchfield
Marcel Breuer Architect with Tician Papachristou

House VI, Cornwall
Peter Eisenman

Smith House, Darien
Richard Meier Architects

Connecticut Architecture – Selection

Yale Arts Complex – Paul Rudolph Hall renovation
Gwathmey Siegel & Associates Architects
Paul Rudolph Hall
photo : Peter Aaron

Paul Rudolph Hall

Yale University Art Gallery
Louis Kahn / Polshek Partnership Architects, LLP
Modern Connecticut Building : Yale

School of Architecture in Connecticut
Yale School of Architecture Events

Another Modern American house on e-architect:

Miller House, Columbus, Indiana
Eero Saarinen
Miller House
photo Courtesy of the Indianapolis Museum of Art

Miller House

Modern American Residence : Zimmerman House, Manchester, New Hampshire, north east USA

Comments / photos for the Philip Johnson Glass House20th Century Connecticut Architecture page welcome

Philip Johnson Glass House

Website: Philip Johnson Glass House