Slow Architecture and Place Exhibition, Ireland, Dublin, Dates, Events

Slow Architecture and Place Exhibition, Ireland, Dublin, Project, News, Design, Image

Slow Architecture and Place – Exhibition, Ireland

Slow Architecture and Place Exhibition Ireland : Information


Slow Architecture and Place

9 Sep – 21 Oct 2010

a travelling exhibition along the grand canal from the Shannon to Dublin
architecture is a deep defence against the terror of time
(karsten harries)

Contained in a typical canal boat – ‘Slow Architecture and Place’ – is a travelling exhibition by the s.a.r.c. curatorial team that will follow the Grand Canal from the Shannon to Dublin from 9 September (launch) to 21 October. On its evocative journey, the boat will visit seven canal-side towns and locations, where the theme and exhibition will be discussed by participating architects and artists with the local community, including schools.

Slow Architecture
photo from the organisers

‘Slow Architecture and Place’ explores responses to the current challenges of our built environment such as rediscovering the joy of making and building, and observing more closely the patterns and rhythms of a place. It investigates how we can encourage people and communities to take time to make a place their own. The context is our recent building climate, where the making of buildings has been influenced by time, speculation and financial deadlines. Our appreciation of architecture, and perhaps too our sense of place, has been largely anaesthetised by this speed of construction.

Architect Mike Haslam, of the curatorial team s.a.r.c. says: “This exhibition and research project should be a timely reminder to us all of the importance of thoughtful design in forming our built environment and, as a travelling exhibition, enjoys both the participation of design professionals and the general public alike”.

Participating Artists and Architects

Caelan Bristow, Róisín de Buitléar, Michael Carroll, Donaghy + Dimond architects, Susan Dunford, Seán Harrington Architects, Emmet Kenny.

Locations and Dates for the travelling exhibition
9 Sep : Belmont Mill, Co Offaly
16 Sep : Tullamore Canal Quay
23 Sep : Daingean Canal Quay
30 Sep : Edenderry Canal Basin
7 Oct : Robertstown Canal Quay
14 Oct : Naas Canal Basin
21 Oct : Dublin Waterways Visitor Centre

There will be an associated lecture and discussion in each location at 6pm on the day of the boat arrival (see above), while some locations also feature school workshops. A final event and panel discussion on the topic of ‘Slow Architecture and Place’ will be held in Dublin on Thursday, 21 October, 5pm at the Waterways Visitor Centre. For more information on events see www.slowarchitecture.ie

About the Exhibition ‘Slow Architecture and Place’

Seán Harrington Architects investigate the design process through the ecology of materials and the interaction with the community. Their research together with Ballymun Regeneration Ltd is based on an actual project: The Rediscovery Centre in Ballymun.

Artist Caelan Bristow investigates the fresh awareness of our surroundings that can be prompted when we tune into our senses. The project called ‘slow weave’ pulls together the recordings of observations made by a number of participants in varying mediums.

Michael Carrol, an architectural graduate, investigates the development of rural nodes for disparate and broken communities and the craft of communal building as means of bringing social and architectural cohesion.

Donaghy and Dimond Architects explore the notion of ‘slow’ within ideas of dwelling, depth in time – of sources, site, provenance of materials and a future archaeology – illustrated through their own work.

Artist Susan Jane Dunford examines the physical effects of the passage of time on buildings, embracing the idea of aging gracefully and of impermanence through the medium of sculpture.

Emmet Kenny, an architectural graduate, investigates Birr and its slow development over two hundred years engendering the urban richness of today and contrasts this with the hit-and-run planning of the last fifteen years.

Artist Róisín de Buitléar looks to vernacular construction methods of rural crafts for making shelters and boundaries as a point of departure for investigating the reuse of waste glass. Róisín will lead a community construction project utilising traditional skills reinterpreted through the medium of glass.

About the Curators
The editorial group s.a.r.c. (slow architectural research collective) was formed in 2009 to develop the research project. The collective consists of architects Mike Haslam, Simona Castelli, Philip Comerford and Eoghan O’Shea; Dr. Sandra O’Connell, writer on architecture and film-maker Paddy Cahill.
The exhibition was made possible with the kind support of the following organisations:

Sponsors
Royal Institute of the Architects in Ireland (RIAI), EASCA, Ecological Building Systems, Solearth Ecological Architecture, Glasgiven Contracts, the Heritage Boat
Association and Waterways Ireland.

Supporters
Belmont Mill, Offaly, Kildare and Dublin Arts Offices, Architecture Ireland.
The canal boat – the 107b – is kindly donated for the exhibition and crewed by the Heritage Boat Association.

Slow Architecture and Place Exhibition image / information from SA


To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.
 

Dublin Architects

Irish Buildings : A-E

Irish Building Developments : F-M

Irish Building Designs : N-Z

Athlone Civic Centre + Square, Athlone, Republic of Ireland
Keith Williams Architects
Athlone Civic Centre
photo : Eamonn O’Mahony
Irish civic building

Aviva Stadium, Dublin, Ireland
Populous
Aviva Stadium Dublin
photo : Chris Gascoigne
Aviva Stadium

A-House
FKL architects
A-House Dublin
photo : Verena Hilgenfeld
A-House Dublin

Irish Architectture

Dublin Buildings : A-K

Dublin Building Designs : L-Z

Irish Architect Office : O’Donnell + Tuomey Architects

Irish Architecture Awards

Comments / photos for the Slow Architecture and Place Architecture Exhibition page welcome:
info@e-architect.co.uk

Slow Architecture and Place Exhibition

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