Riverside Teahouse Sichuan

Riverside Teahouse, Fuzhou, Fujian, China

Architects: Lin Kaixin Design

In the riverside teahouse, the “teahouse is whispering, smart and contemporary, whereas the river is running, thick and ancient. When the two are in organic combination, they are no longer independent individuals, but one in whole”.

Boa Nova Tea House

Boa Nova Tea House, Portugal

Design: Álvaro Siza, architect

New photos of the restoration of his first building, first opened in 1963. A casual pavilion, snuggled into a rocky promontory on Portugal’s Atlantic coast, left to be vandalized and gutted.

Tea Houses California

Tea Houses California

The idea for the Tea Houses originated years ago, when the owner and his young daughter explored the remote hills surrounding their Silicon Valley home, discovering an idyllic setting below a ridge, under a grove of large California Live Oak trees.

El Te Porto Alegre

El Té – Brazilian Tea House

Design: Gustavo Sbardelotto & Mariana Bogarin

Located in one of the most important commercial galleries in the city of Porto Alegre, El té – Casa de chás (tea house) focuses on the sale of teas and everything that involves the product.

The project concept was born from the immersion in the world of teas. All its colors, textures and aromas were the starting point for creating this environment. Wood was elected as the primary materiality of the project , acting as a neutral base where the colorful herbs are the highlight.

Tea House in Shanghai

Tea House Shanghai: J-Office, Yangpu District Building

Tea House Shanghai, Jungong Road Building, Yangpu District Design, Image Tea House Shanghai Yangpu District Building, China – design by Archi-Union Architects 12 Mar 2012 Tea House, J-Office Shanghai Tea House, J-Office in Shanghai Location: Jungong Road, Yangpu District, Shanghai Design: Archi-Union Architects The Tea House, located in the backyard of Archi-Union’s J-office, is constructed…

Dutch Tea House, Vreeland Holland: UN Studio Design

Architect: UNStudio

The two bunkers are additions made in 1936 to the nineteenth century New Dutch Water line of defence; an 85km long protective garland of military objects combined with an intricate water management system that enabled the inundation of land in case of attack.