St Pancras Renaissance, London Hotel Building, St Pancras Renaissance London, English Hotel

St Pancras Renaissance London, English Hotel Building, Image, Architect, Photo

St Pancras Renaissance : London Hotel

St Pancras Renaissance Hotel, London, England, UK

Gothic Renaissance in St Pancras

Gothic as a style has been living it’s revival in culture for some time now, to mention the most recent fascination with vampires thanks to the Twilight saga at the very least. There is a romantic notion of gothic architecture giving home to spiritual secrets and creating fantasy worlds. It’s not surprising then that a Victorian – Gothic building in the heart of London has just been brought to life in one of the most spectacular restorations. The former Midland Grand reopened its doors as another 5 star London hotel – St Pancras Renaissance.

St Pancras Hotel London
photo © Morley von Sternberg

The vision of Sir Gilbert Scott, originally brought to life in 1860s, was meant to extend the St Pancras station frontage and drew an obvious inspiration from the Gothic Revival Palace of Westminster, nowadays known as the Houses of Parliament. The hotel’s design was equally ornate, yet more subtle and colourful, knowingly mixing both Venetian and English Gothic. Scott’s plans included using red brick to accentuate the material that brought Midlands to wealth. He also insisted on highest skilled stonemasons being employed to create an interior that would meet the Victorian imagination’s expectation, reviving the medieval Gothic techniques. As a result, the decor boasts carved capitals, gargoyles, headstops, polished limestone pillars. The historical Ladies’ Smoking Room, currently used as a function room, has a breathtaking ceiling painting in faded palette.

St Pancras London
photo © Adrian Welch

The former forecourt through which taxis would take guests inside the hotel has been artfully covered and became the main reception, while the ticket office is reborn as a bar. The room inside the side entrance features a jewel-coloured Gothic ceiling and 22-carat gold gilded cornices. However the main showpiece is the famous staircase, featured not only in ‘The Servant’ starring Dirk Bogarde, but also, more infamously, in Spice Girls ‘Wannabe’ video, has been painstakingly brought back to its original splendour, with original wrought iron balustrades curled up three stories and Briton carpets rewoven in antique colours. Even the ceiling decorations, with fleur-de-lis patterns and a celestial scene of seven Virtues have been stripped from layers of paint fully restored – a true masterpiece of High Victorian, neo-Gothic extravagance.

St Pancras Station London
photo © Adrian Welch

The breathtaking St Pancras Renaissance hotel will only slightly disappoint those expecting period Victorian room interiors – these were modernised to the highest standards. However the dark, romantic feel remains inside the monumental cathedral-like walls. The ones craving more historical knowledge will benefit from guided tours run by Royden Stock, once a security staff member who has seen every aspect of the restoration process. The Grade-I listed landmark has been truly brought back to life.

Magda Wrzeszcz

St Pancras Hotel
Date built: 1864-68
Architect/Engineer: William Henry Barlow

St Pancras Hotel
St Pancras Hotel
photo © Morley von Sternberg

St Pancras Station
St Pancras Station London building
photo © Adrian Welch

St Pancras Station architect : George Gilbert Scott

Address: Euston Road, City of London NW1 3AU

Contact: 020 7841 3540


To see all listed projects on a single map please follow this link.
 

London Architecture

London Architecture Tours

London Architects

St Pancras Renaissance neighbour : Kings Cross Station

St Pancras : Church building

St Pancras Chambers Hotel – New Wing, north London
Richard Griffiths Architects

London railway station : Euston
Euston Station London
photo © Adrian Welch

St Pancras Station Concourses architect : Chapman Taylor

London Architect

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St Pancras Renaissance – page

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