Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, London

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, Architect, Design, Project, Pictures, England, Location

Serpentine Pavilion London : Kensington Gardens Gallery

Arts Project in Kensington Gardens, London, UK

Serpentine Pavilion 2017

page updated 8 Sep 2016 ; 22 Aug 2013

Serpentine Pavilion 2013

Serpentine Pavilion design by Sou Fujimoto

Sou Fujimoto is a 41-year-old Japanese architect.

The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 will be designed by multi award-winning Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto.

“It is a really fundamental question how architecture is different from nature, or how architecture could be part of nature, or how they could be merged…what are the boundaries between nature and artificial things.” Sou Fujimoto

Serpentine Pavilion 2013 video – external link

He is the thirteenth and, at 41, youngest architect to accept the invitation to design a temporary structure for the Serpentine Gallery. The most ambitious architectural programme of its kind worldwide, the Serpentine’s annual Pavilion commission is one of the most anticipated announcements on the cultural calendar. Past Pavilions have included designs by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei (2012), Frank Gehry (2008), the late Oscar Niemeyer (2003) and Zaha Hadid, who designed the inaugural structure in 2000.

Serpentine Pavilion 2013
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 Designed by Sou Fujimoto © Sou Fujimoto Architects ; Image © 2013 Iwan Baan

Widely acknowledged as one of the most important architects coming to prominence worldwide, Sou Fujimoto is the leading light of an exciting generation of artists who are re-inventing our relationship with the built environment. Inspired by organic structures, such as the forest, the nest and the cave, Fujimoto’s signature buildings inhabit a space between nature and artificiality. Fujimoto has completed the majority of his buildings in Japan, with commissions ranging from the domestic, such as Final Wooden House, T House and House N, to the institutional, such as the Musashino Art Museum and Library at Musashino Art University.

Serpentine Pavilion
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 Designed by Sou Fujimoto © Sou Fujimoto Architects ; Image © 2013 Iwan Baan

Occupying some 350 square-metres of lawn in front of the Serpentine Gallery, Sou Fujimoto’s delicate, latticed structure of 20mm steel poles will have a lightweight and semi-transparent appearance that will allow it to blend, cloud-like, into the landscape and against the classical backdrop of the Gallery’s colonnaded East wing. Designed as a flexible, multi-purpose social space – with a café sited inside – visitors will be encouraged to enter and interact with the Pavilion in different ways throughout its four-month tenure in London’s Kensington Gardens.

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 Designed by Sou Fujimoto © Sou Fujimoto Architects ; Image © 2013 Iwan Baan

Julia Peyton-Jones, Director, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director, Serpentine Gallery, said:
“We are thrilled to be working with one of the most fascinating architects in the world today. A visionary, who has conceived an extraordinary response to our invitation to design the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, Sou Fujimoto has designed a structure that will enthral everyone that encounters it throughout the summer.”

Serpentine Pavilion building
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 Designed by Sou Fujimoto Indicative CGI © Sou Fujimoto Architects

Describing his design concept, Sou Fujimoto said:
“For the 2013 Pavilion I propose an architectural landscape: a transparent terrain that encourages people to interact with and explore the site in diverse ways. Within the pastoral context of Kensington Gardens, I envisage the vivid greenery of the surrounding plant life woven together with a constructed geometry. A new form of environment will be created, where the natural and the man-made merge; not solely architectural nor solely natural, but a unique meeting of the two.

Serpentine Pavilion building
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2013 Designed by Sou Fujimoto Indicative CGI © Sou Fujimoto Architects

The Pavilion will be a delicate, three-dimensional structure, each unit of which will be composed of fine steel bars. It will form a semi-transparent, irregular ring, simultaneously protecting visitors from the elements while allowing them to remain part of the landscape. The overall footprint will be 350 square-metres and the Pavilion will have two entrances. A series of stepped terraces will provide seating areas that will allow the Pavilion to be used as a flexible, multi-purpose social space.

Tokyo Apartment by Sou Fujimoto
‘Tokyo Apartment’ Designed by Sou Fujimoto Architects © Iwan Baan

The delicate quality of the structure, enhanced by its semi-transparency, will create a geometric, cloud-like form, as if it were mist rising from the undulations of the park. From certain vantage points, the Pavilion will appear to merge with the classical structure of the Serpentine Gallery, with visitors suspended in space.”

Sou Fujimoto

Fujimoto is the third Japanese architect to accept the invitation to design the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, following Toyo Ito in 2002 and Kazuyo Sejima & Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA in 2009

Serpentine Sackler Gallery, Kensington Gardens, London, UK
Design: Zaha Hadid Architects

Serpentine Pavilion 2012

Serpentine Pavilion design by Herzog + de Meuron with Ai Weiwei

Photos by Adrian Welch, 1 Oct 2012:

Serpentine Pavilion building Serpentine Pavilion 2012 Serpentine Pavilion building 2012 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion building
photos © Adrian Welch

5 Jun 2012

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion – Herzog and de Meuron with Ai Weiwei

The Serpentine Gallery reveals photos of the completed Pavilion design by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London
photos © 2012 Iwan Baan

This year’s Pavilion takes visitors beneath the Serpentine’s lawn to explore the hidden history of its previous Pavilions. Eleven columns characterising each past Pavilion and a twelfth column representing the current structure support a floating platform roof 1.4 metres above ground. The Pavilion’s interior is clad in cork, a sustainable building material chosen for its unique qualities and to echo the excavated earth. Taking an archaeological approach, the architects have created a design that will inspire visitors to look beneath the surface of the park as well as back in time across the ghosts of the earlier structures.

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London
photos © 2012 Iwan Baan

8 May 2012

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion – Herzog and de Meuron with Ai Weiwei

Serpentine Gallery reveals plans for Pavilion designed by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei

The Serpentine Gallery today released plans for the 2012 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion designed by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei. It will be the twelfth commission in the Gallery’s annual series, the world’s first and most ambitious architectural programme of its kind.

The design team responsible for the celebrated Beijing National Stadium, which was built for the 2008 Olympic Games, comes together again in London in 2012 for the Serpentine’s acclaimed annual commission, being presented as part of the London 2012 Festival, the culmination of the Cultural Olympiad. The Pavilion is Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei’s first collaborative built structure in the UK.

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012
Designed by Herzog & de Meuron & Ai Weiwei
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London design Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London design Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London design
images : © 2012, by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei

Julia Peyton-Jones, Director, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director, Serpentine Gallery, said: “It is a great honour to be working with Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei, the design team behind Beijing’s superb Bird’s Nest Stadium. In this exciting year for London we are proud to be creating a connection between the Beijing 2008 and the London 2012 Games. We are enormously grateful for the help of everyone involved, especially Usha and Lakshmi N. Mittal, whose incredible support has made this project possible.”

The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion will operate as a public space and as a venue for Park Nights, the Gallery’s high-profile programme of public talks and events. Connecting to the archaeological focus of the Pavilion design, Park Nights will culminate in October with the Serpentine Gallery Memory Marathon, the latest edition of the annual Serpentine Marathon series conceived by Hans Ulrich Obrist, now in its seventh year. The Marathon series began in 2006 with the 24-hour Serpentine Gallery Interview Marathon; followed by the Experiment Marathon in 2007; the Manifesto Marathon in 2008; the Poetry Marathon in 2009, the Map Marathon in 2010 and the Garden Marathon in 2011.

The 2012 Pavilion has been purchased by Usha and Lakshmi N. Mittal and will enter their private collection after it closes to the public in October 2012.

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012
Designed by Herzog & de Meuron & Ai Weiwei
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London design Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London design Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 London design
images : © 2012, by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei

Opening

The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 designed by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei will take place from 1 June to 14 October 2012.

Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei said:
“Every year since 2000, a different architect has been responsible for creating the Serpentine Gallery’s summer Pavilion for Kensington Gardens. That makes eleven Pavilions so far, our contribution will be the twelfth. So many Pavilions in so many different shapes and out of so many different materials have been conceived and built that we tried instinctively to sidestep the unavoidable problem of creating an object, a concrete shape.

Jacques Herzog (left) and Pierre de Meuron (right)
Herzog & de Meuron
image © 2012, by Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei

“Our path to an alternative solution involves digging down some five feet into the soil of the park until we reach the groundwater. There we dig a waterhole, a kind of well, to collect all of the London rain that falls in the area of the Pavilion. In that way we incorporate an otherwise invisible aspect of reality in the park – the water under the ground – into our Pavilion. As we dig down into the earth we encounter a diversity of constructed realities such as telephone cables and former foundations. Like a team of archaeologists, we identify these physical fragments as remains of the eleven Pavilions built between 2000 and 2011. Their shape varies: circular, long and narrow, dots and also large, constructed hollows that have been filled in. These remains testify to the existence of the former Pavilions and their greater or lesser intervention in the natural environment of the park.

Ai Weiwei
image : © Ai Weiwei

“All of these foundations will now be uncovered and reconstructed. The old foundations form a jumble of convoluted lines, like a sewing pattern. A distinctive landscape emerges out of the reconstructed foundations which is unlike anything we could have invented; its form and shape is actually a serendipitous gift. The three-dimensional reality of this landscape is astonishing and it is also the perfect place to sit, stand, lie down or just look and be amazed. In other words, the ideal environment for continuing to do what visitors have been doing in the Serpentine Gallery Pavilions over the past eleven years – and a discovery for the many new visitors anticipated for the London 2012 Olympic Games.

Herzog & de Meuron Ai Weiwei
Film Still Bird’s Nest – Herzog & de Meuron in China © 2008 by T&C Film AG

“On the foundations of each single Pavilion, we extrude a new structure (supports, walls) as load-bearing elements for the roof of our Pavilion – eleven supports all told, plus our own column that we can place at will, like a wild card. The roof resembles that of an archaeological site. It floats a few feet above the grass of the park, so that everyone visiting can see the water on it, its surface reflecting the infinitely varied, atmospheric skies of London. For special events, the water can be drained off the roof as from a bathtub, from whence it flows back into the waterhole, the deepest point in the Pavilion landscape. The dry roof can then be used as a dance floor or simply as a platform suspended above the park.”

Cork

Referring to the extensive use of cork in the design, Herzog & de Meuron said: “Cork is a natural material with wonderful haptic and olfactory qualities with the versatility to be carved, cut, shaped and formed, as demonstrated in many historical examples of cork architectural models.”

National Stadium, Beijing, China
Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei
National Stadium Beijing China National Stadium Beijing China National Stadium Beijing China
images © Iwan Baan

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012 images / information from Serpentine Gallery

7 Feb 2012

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2012

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion – Herzog and de Meuron with Ai Weiwei

Herzog and de Meuron teams up with Ai Weiwei on Serpentine pavilion

Four years after designing the spectacular Bird’s Nest Olympic stadium in Beijing, the Swiss architects Herzog & de Meuron and the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei are to reunite for a London 2012 project.

The Serpentine Gallery announced today that the Beijing team would collaborate once more to design this year’s pavilion – the 12th commission in what has become a major annual event on the architecture calendar.

Julia Peyton-Jones, the director of the Serpentine Gallery, said it was “tremendously exciting”. She added: “What is so fantastic is that it is this extraordinary link of the two games, a Beijing-London axis…These are old and dear friends, so for them [Jacques Herzog, Pierre de Meuron and Ai Weiwei] they are picking up where they left off – it is a continuation of a conversation that began in Beijing to great effect and they have conceived something really remarkable for our lawn.”

Ai Weiwei has been planning the project with Herzog and de Meuron using Skype and it remains to be seen whether he will be allowed to leave China by the time the pavilion is up in June.

A few details of their plans have been revealed including the indication of it being the lowest pavilion ever, with the roof barely 5ft off the ground. People will be able to go under it because they also plan to dig down a few feet.

In a joint statement they said they would celebrate past Serpentine Pavilions as well as their own but it would not look like anything that had gone before. “So many pavilions in so many different shapes and out of so many different materials have been conceived and built that we tried instinctively to sidestep the unavoidable problem of creating an object, a concrete shape.”

There will be 12 columns – 11 representing the past pavilions and one for the present – supporting a floating platform roof 5ft from the ground. That roof will collect rain water and reflect the sky as well as being capable of being drained and used for special events “as a dance floor or simply as a platform suspended above the park”.

The pavilion, they promise, will become “the perfect place to sit, stand, lie down or just look and be amazed”.

It will go up in June as part of the London 2012 festival which will mark the culmination of the Cultural Olympiad.

Herzog & de Meuron Architects

Ai Weiwei

Serpentine Gallery Event

Serpentine Gallery Garden Marathon

Two-day live event hosts artists, scientists and thinkers creating garden inspired works

15-16 Oct 2011

The Serpentine Gallery Garden Marathon is the sixth in the Gallery’s acclaimed Marathon series. This two-day event is an exploration of the concept of the garden and inspired by the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011 designed by Peter Zumthor and the garden inside, designed by Piet Oudolf.

Contributions will include explorations of the spatial, urban and scientific importance of gardens by key figures from horticulture, design and architecture. The Marathon will also present works by artists, poets, writers and philosophers, exploring the significance of the garden in our experience of the world, as well as cutting-edge research in biodiversity, conservation and genetics.

Elizabeth Diller – The Highline, New York:
The Highline New York The Highline New York
photos : Iwan Baan

Marathon participants:

Curated by Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director of Exhibitions and Programmes and Director of International Projects; Sally Tallant, Head of Programmes; Nicola Lees, Public Programmes Curator and Lucia Pietroiusti, Assistant Curator, Serpentine Gallery. Gardens have been a source of inspiration for artists, writers and poets such as Ian Hamilton Finlay whose words can be seen in the permanent installation in the Gallery’s grounds.

Charles Jencks – The Avenue of Doubles focuses through a sewer pipe on a volcano 375 million years old:
Serpentine Pavilion 2010
image from Serpentine Gallery

Serpentine Gallery Marathons are a unique series of events that bring together the fields of art, culture, science and technology. Previous Marathons have included last year’s Map Marathon 2010, following on from the Poetry Marathon 2009, Manifesto Marathon 2008, Experiment Marathon 2007 and the Interview Marathon 2006.

Stefano Boeri – Vertical Forest:
Serpentine Pavilion 2010
image from Serpentine Gallery

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion – Past Designs

Serpentine 2011 Pavilion by Peter Zumthor

Zumthor Serpentine Pavilion
picture from Serpentine Gallery

Serpentine Pavilion 2010 by Jean Nouvel

Serpentine Pavilion 2010
images © Ateliers Jean Nouvel

Serpentine Pavilion 2009 by SANAA Architects

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion
photo © Nick Weall

Serpentine Gallery – temporary shelters
2007
Zaha Hadid Architects
Location: Kensington Gardens, west London

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Serpentine Gallery Pavilion
photo © Luke Hayes

Serpentine Pavilion 2007 : Zaha Hadid

Lilas Pavilion at Chatsworth House – 8 Sep 2016
Relocation of the ZHA design to Chatsworth.

Serpentine Gallery Pavilion info from Zaha Hadid Architects


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Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2015
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Four Summer Houses in the Serpentine 2016 Programme

Serpentine Pavilion 2007 original architect : Snøhetta
Serpentine Pavilion architect 2006 : Rem Koolhaas
Serpentine Pavilion architect 2005 : Álvaro Siza & Eduardo Souto de Moura
Serpentine Pavilion architect 2003 : Oscar Niemeyer
Serpentine Pavilion architect 2002 : Toyo Ito
Serpentine Pavilion architect 2001 : Daniel Libeskind
Serpentine Pavilion architect 2000 : Zaha Hadid




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